Landscape design plays an important role in the success of your winery. Here is the fourth of five tips to help build outdoor environments and experiences to positively impact your tasting room.

#4 Create a Variety of Spaces

 

Entertaining Spaces: Most tasting rooms operate best with a variety of different spaces to fit the different preferences of visitors and functions of the winery. If you desire to host large events, a central large patio can be quite useful. However, most tasting room landscapes are a connection of smaller nooks to provide multiple intimate experiences for a large number of visitors. Also, the space becomes a social environment, not feeling empty with small crowds, and feeling comfortable with large crowds. In tip #2 we spoke about visitors liking a special and exclusive experience. A visitor may achieve this by finding their favorite nook in the landscape and returning to that special spot over the years. Everyone is different, so a variety of spaces, furniture, paving patterns, and shrubbery can break a large area into a successful multi-user experience.

(Photo by Valerie Imhof – Halter Ranch, Tasting Room Seating Patio)

 

User Experience: Preferences of tasting room visitors have interesting trends. Folks that are new to the tasting room experience like to go up to a tasting bar and stand during the tasting. Research shows that experienced tasting room visitors often prefer to sit down in a lounge-type area. They come to relax and unwind, and they don’t feel they are imposing when asking for drinks to be brought to them. These experienced tasters often buy more wine and are more likely to join the wine club. Wineries know this, and design both indoor and outdoor elements to provide ample comfortable seating. Other wineries provide entertainment areas with games or picnicking room. The bottom line is that comfortable seating nooks sell wine.

(Photo by Daniel Mazawa – Brecon Estate Wines, ZinFest 2014)

 

 

Tasting Room Logistics: Tasting room landscapes also need to work for the people operating the business. Often the central hub is the main tasting bar, so it is helpful to have visibility of all tasting areas for the attendants to best serve everyone efficiently. Open connection between indoors and outdoors feels good for the visitor, but also makes it easier for servers to navigate while carrying glasses of wine. It is crucial to speak with the tasting room staff to know how to best orchestrate the activities of the business.

(Photo by Megan Savage – Chronic Cellars, Tasting Room Patio)

 

 

 

Miss a beat? We got you covered!

Part 1: Be Unique & Memorable

Part 2: Make it Feel Special

Part 3: Take Advantage of your Site

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